Sinhala day Programme – FGLF 2019

Fairway Galle Literary Festival, for the third consecutive time this year, has a full day Sinhala programme that brings together some of the most thought-provoking and creative poets,  novelists, translators, columnists, theatre directors and critics for discussion, debate and readings.

Sinhala Literature has responded with creative flair to the contemporary social and political changes within the country, as well as the formal innovations in literary forms, internationally. These aspects will be highlighted at the Festival. It promises to be a lively day for all lovers of Sinhala Literature.

FGLF Sinhala day Programme 2019 – author profiles

 

Asoka Handagama

 Asoka Handagama is considered the leader of the third generation of Sri Lankan cinema. His films, ‘This is my moon” (2000) which won the Woosok Award for Best Film at JIFF 2001 and “Flying with one wing” (2002) which won the Award for Best Asian Film at Tokyo International Film Festival focus on harsh socio –political realities in society, and explore new forms and narratives. His latest film “Asandhimitta” is his ninth full-length feature.  He is also a television programme producer, writer and theatre director. His award winning theatre productions are “Bhumika” (1985), “Hena” (1987) and “Maghatha”(1989).

 Shanthi Dissanayaka

Shanthi Dissanayaka was born in Anuradhapura, Sri Lanka in a dry-zone colony and she writes about her own surroundings. She has published over 30 novels and short story collections. Dissanayaka won the D. R. Wijewardena Award for Best manuscript for ‘Waramal” in 1998 and won Vidyodaya Literary Award for the Best published novel for the same title in 1999.  She won the Godage Literary Award for her novel “Sangramaya” in 2003. Her novel “Parandel” was nominated for Swarna Pusthaka Award in 2012.

Kalpana Ambrose

Kalpana Ambrose has published four poetry collections;Me NihandaWeralataEnna (2011), Oba GamburuNindaka (2016), PiyaNohambuPiyapath (2018) and Nopawathinu was PremayawaPawathimi (2018). Her works have been translated into different languages and were published on several local and international magazines, journals,anthologies including the ones published by SAARC cultural fund and University of Kelaniya. A collection of Tamil poems translated into Sinhala language is another work being completed by her. Kalpana earned her BA degree from University of Peradeniyamajoring in Psychology. After completing her post graduate studies in Environmental Management she is working on her Master’s degree in the same stream.  She is currently working as an independent researcher, writer and consultant as an expert in the fields of communication, education and environmental issues.

Kaushalya Fernando

Kaushalya came to the national theatre with her role in Marat Sade in 1986 and conquered theSri Lankan stage theatre portraying intense and challenging characters in plays such as, the House of Bernada Alba, Men without Shadows, The Respectable Prostitute, Death and the Maiden, Antigone, Blood Wedding, etc. 

In 2004 she directed Garcia Lorca’s “Blood Wedding” in Sinhala and it was adjudged the Best Play of the Year at the National Drama Festival 2005. She continued to direct plays including plays on women’s issues in Sri Lanka for several non-governmental organisations. 

Kaushalya played lead female in a number of internationally acclaimed Sri Lankan films since 1996. She has won many national and a few international award and commendation for acting. In 2016 she was awarded Professional and Career Women Award for her exceptional contribution and achievements in the field of Arts and Aesthetics.

 

Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe

Ajith Perakum Jayasinghe has published two political novels, one short story collection and one poetry collection. He is an active blogger and social media influencer who also contributes regular articles to newspapers. He wrote his latest novel KPoint based on his personal experience in the People’s Liberation Front (JVP) and the ill-famous Eliyakanda torture center in Matara during the period between 1987-1990.

Lahiru Kithalagama

Lahiru Kithalagama is reading for a MA in Mass Communication at University of Kelaniya, Sri Lanka from where he obtained a BA in Peace and Conflict Resolution. Kithalagama has published two poetry collections; ” Pinidiya Wessa”(2011) and “Kawulu Esa Pamula” (2017). ‘Kawulu Esa Pamula” was nominated for the State Literary Award and it won the Rajatha Pusthaka Award.

Ruwan Bandujeewa

Ruwan Bandujeewa is a poet with an interest in contemporary social context of Sri Lanka. He has published two poetry collections “Alcohol nomethi sanda” (2008) and “Meelanga Meewitha”(2014). “Meelanga Meewitha” won both Vidyodaya Literary Award and Godage Literary Award for the Best Poetry Collection in 2014. Bandujeewa  holds a B.Sc (Special) degree in Business Administration from University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka.

 Achinthya Bandara

 Achinthya Bandara is a Lecturer at the Department of Sinhala, University of Colombo and a visiting lecturer at University of Moratuwa, and SLIIT Campus. He has obtained his Bachelors degree from University of Colombo and La Trobe University, Australia and the MA in Linguistics degree from Texas Tech University, USA. He is a linguist, a researcher, a script writer and a public speaker.

Padmini Senevirathna 

Padmini Senevirathna holds a BA from University of Peradeniya. She is a retired school teacher. Senevirathna’s debut novel “Na Gachchathi” received accolades from  critics. Her second novel “Warana” got shortlisted for Fairway National Literary Awards 2018.

 Sahan Kaseera Wickramasinghe  

Sahan Kaseera Wickramasinghe is a banker by profession.  He is a  features writer, columnist, translator, script writer and blogger. 

He has published three books: “Achchige Kolama”  , “Achchige Kolama 2 “and “Wachana 400”.

He works as a freelance print journalist covering the subjects like literature, art and cinema. 

Aruna Premarathne

Aruna Premarathne hold a BA Sinhala Special Degree from University of Colombo. He has translated and adopted several international theatre productions to Sinhala. 

He has won several awards for his tele-drama scripts. His most known tele-drama scripts are “Beddekulawamiya” and “Chess”. His debut novel “Tharu wisula reya’ won the Fairway National Literary Award 2018.

Ruwan Bandujeewa

Ruwan Bandujeewa is a poet with an interest in contemporary social context of Sri Lanka. He has published two poetry collections “Alcohol nomethi sanda” (2008) and “Meelanga Meewitha”(2014). “Meelanga Meewitha” won both Vidyodaya Literary Award and Godage Literary Award for the Best Poetry Collection in 2014. Bandujeewa  holds a B.Sc (Special) degree in Business Administration from University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Sri Lanka.

Sepali Mayadunne

Children’s Programme – FGLF 2019

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival 2019 Children’s Programme will take place on the 19th and 20th of January at the Thomas Gall School. Aimed at a range of children from ages 2+ to 12+, this weekend event features sessions with local and international writers and performing artists. Tickets for each day are priced between Rs.1,500.00 and Rs.3,500.00.

Events include live action re-enactments of parts of the Trojan War and the Ramayana, a Mission to Mars with the Game Masters from Lanka Comic Con, literary quizzes, a treasure hunt and a safari based on endangered species in Sri Lanka. Younger participants will have storytelling sessions and interactive workshops with authors Nandana Sen, Shama Perera, Srianjali Gunasena and art therapist Shimali Perera. Older participants will also have a workshop with activist Jake Oorloff on ‘The Girl Who Lost Her Country’, which is about the increasing number of global child refugees.

The programme also features poetry sessions with Ohan Hominis and Larry T Hill and theatre workshops with Tracy Holsinger, Brandon Ingram and Kimaya de Silva.

Participants will have music sessions that investigate different cultural traditions with The Soul, who will also be performing live from 6 to 7pm on the 19th –

More details about all the sessions can be found programmes section.

To register for this free concert, email – thechildrensprogramme.fglf@gmail.com.

DFCC Bank partners with FGLF 2019

DFCC Bank will partner the Fairway Galle Literary Festival 2019 as the Official Banking Partner for the second consecutive year. Officials from DFCC Bank and the festival committee gathered at a press conference on October 25, where the Deputy CEO of DFCC Bank, Thimal Perera, handed over the sponsorship formally to Sunela Samaranayake, Festival Director of Fairway Galle Literary Festival 2019, as the official banking partner for the event. Fairway Galle Literary Festival, since its launch in 2007, has become one of the most anticipated literary events in South East Asia for both authors and literary enthusiasts around the world.

The festival is celebrated annually, in and around the historic Dutch Galle Fort, an UNESCO World Heritage Site. By sustaining its commitment to the culturally significant event, DFCC Bank has proved its credentials as a true and committed patron of arts and culture in the country, helping put Sri Lanka on the global literary map.

To be held from 16th to 20th January 2019, the festival will attract renowned writers such as Sir David Hare – one of the best known contemporary playwrights; Kamila Shamsie, a respected voice in literature who has just had her latest book, Home Fire, long-listed for the Man Booker Prize; celebrated photojournalist Sir Don MuCullin; poet Vahni Capildeo; Canadian writer Madeleine Thien; detective writer Anthony Horowitz; famed Sri Lankan writer Romesh Gunasekera; and noted historian and author Sir William Dalrymple. Furthermore, children’s book author Nandana Das will contribute to the children’s programme at the festival while celebrity chef Peter Kuruwita is expected to launch his latest cookbook at the venue.

Commenting on the sponsorship, Deputy CEO of DFCC Bank, Thimal Perera said: “DFCC Bank is pleased to continue its commitment to one of the premier literary events in the world, the Fairway Galle Literary Festival, once again in 2019. This event not only attracts renowned literary and arts and culture personalities to Sri Lanka, but it has also raised Sri Lanka’s profile as a country that values knowledge and learning. DFCC Bank will ensure that our customers get the best out of the festival by accessing our services at the venue while also enjoying some of the exciting events we have planned throughout the festival.”

DFCC Bank is a fully-fledged commercial bank and prides itself on delivering tailor-made products that are designed to meet the specific financial needs of both retail and business customers, attractive interest rates, structured repayment plans, easy access to all funds and fast and prompt customer service. The Bank has been rapidly growing its footprint across the country with a network of 138 branches and service points. Furthermore, the southern region remains one of the bank’s key areas for expansion and growth, attracting an increasing number of customers seeking reliable financial services that support their personal and business needs and specific lending requirements.

DFCC Bank was recently recognised as one of the Top 10 Most Admired Companies in Sri Lanka by the Chartered Institute of Management Accountants (CIMA) and the International Chamber of Commerce Sri Lanka (ICCSL). It is rated AA-(lka) by Fitch Ratings Lanka Limited.

Original Article – http://www.island.lk/index.php?page_cat=article-details&page=article-details&code_title=194524

Sir David Hare’s BBC 2 TV series – “Collateral”

I had the idea for Collateral a couple of years ago as I was watching a man deliver a pizza on a motorbike in the street next to my home.

I didn’t know at that point that food delivery riders are the most robbed people in London. But it was already becoming clear that the “gig economy”, which involves more and more people, depends, in certain areas, on illegal immigrants, non-unionised practices and generally dodgy conditions of employment.

A lot of people live today without paperwork. As in Dickens, society has a definite underbelly – little seen, little referred to and little explored.

I wondered, then, why this essential shift in my country turned up so rarely in television drama. I first wrote for BBC television in 1973 (a Play for Today), in the great days when a single play would regularly attract eight million viewers. There were so few channels that you knew up to half the viewing public would sit down on any one night to watch a film on any subject that grabbed your imagination.

In the following years, however many one-offs I wrote, I never attempted episodic television. The scale of it scared me. An hour was hard enough, let alone four. But when my aim became to show how the murder of one Arab refugee in south London could resonate through a whole series of different worlds, I knew I had to swallow hard and settle my nerves.

I wanted to write a thriller that would portray a variety of different British institutions. Some, like the police service and the Labour Party, would already be familiar on the small screen. But I also wanted to write about the church, the Army, the security services and, most of all, about our peculiar and neglected removal system.

There was a scandal in 2015 when Channel 4 managed to conceal undercover cameras inside Yarl’s Wood Immigration Removal Centre in Bedfordshire. They revealed serious abuse, and the inspector of prisons was moved to call it “a place of national concern”. The private company that runs Yarl’s Wood, on behalf of the Government, was forced to commission its own internal inquiry.

Inevitably, a facility where so many women wait indefinitely to hear the outcome of their appeal against deportation – with absolutely no idea of when or whether they might be released – raises serious questions of natural justice. But the reaction to the resulting Lampard report was depressing proof that the mistreatment of detainees was not a matter of urgency either to hardened bureaucrats at the Home Office or to our elected representatives. Out of sight, out of mind.

This new century is surely going to bring us a lot more refugees, asylum seekers and would-be economic migrants. If we persist with locking up detainees indefinitely, the centres are going to get bigger, not smaller. At a time of national austerity, Western societies want ways of protecting their wealth, and to keep the poor outside their boundaries.

Yet the free market theoretically depends on the free movement of people for its vitality, and politicians talk all the time of their belief in unfettered competition.

Still, foreigners who travel the Mediterranean by boat, fleeing from war, poverty and persecution, all seem indiscriminately unwelcome in countries, which feel a threat to their own prosperity. Organisations dedicated to counting numbers arriving here were once suspected to be racist. Not any more.

Donald Trump’s proposal for a wall with Mexico and the UK’s admittedly narrow vote for Brexit can both be seen as evidence of attitudes hardening in the West towards aspirational newcomers. At the very moment when hostility to immigrants is growing, is it coincidence that we are also developing a deep distrust of our own institutions?

We still believe in private virtue, in the goodness of our friends, families and acquaintances, but we’re more and more cynical about the intentions and behaviour of professionals. In opinion surveys, government, business, the banks, the press and lawyers all enjoy record low levels of trust and esteem.

Everyone who was once seen to be serving the public interest is today automatically assumed to be in it for themselves. Even teachers and doctors, still our most respected citizens, are not immune.

What really began to interest me is how hard it must be for well-meaning individuals to do their best within institutions that seem so crabbed in with defensive rules and regulations.

How is it possible for any one person to exercise their own judgement and conscience? How much wiggle room do public servants have left? If nobody trusts you, and everyone is waiting for you to put a foot wrong, how does an ordinary public employee find the space to get on with their job?

These may be weighty themes, but I was determined to keep them fleet and on the move. Narrative drama has enjoyed a well-publicised renaissance in the past ten years, and the best series have always been the boldest, aiming to annexe new subjects.

LONDON, ENGLAND – JANUARY 17: Sir David Hare and Carey Mulligan attend a special screening and Q&A for “Collateral” at BFI Southbank on January 17, 2018 in London, England. (Photo by David M. Benett/Dave Benett/Getty Images)

Television writers will tell you that very few projects move through development at great speed. Collateral did. The BBC was gratifyingly keen to make a series about immigration and did everything they could to hurry it, encouraging me to write under the cosh.

As soon as I finished four scripts, SJ Clarkson came back from America, where she’d been directing Marvel’s The Defenders, to take charge of the filming.

From the very start I’d planned a real ensemble enterprise, with at least eight leading characters. But when the first actor we asked, the great Carey Mulligan, agreed to take on her first big television role in recent years as Kip Glaspie, the detective in charge of investigating the murder, both SJ and I sensed we had the chance to make something special.

In the following weeks, I don’t recall a single available actor turning us down. It turns out that if you take television drama into new territory, then an awful lot of people will want to come with you.

Within a few weeks, we were looking at a cast including Billie Piper, John Simm, Hayley Squires, Nicola Walker, Nathaniel Martello-White, Jeany Spark, Saskia Reeves, Richard McCabe and Deborah Findlay.

I called it the National Theatre of the tube. I would turn up to watch filming and find yet another great actor in front of the lens.

A lot has been written about television replacing film as the vital performing art form of our day. It’s certainly true that the survival of cinema has been threatened by the rise of spoilt auteurs who trash scripts, treat actors as lackies and pretend everything is about their so-called vision. I was thrilled to find television still working exactly as it did 45 years ago when I first started, with a perfect collaborative balance of power between actor, writer, director and crew.

In Collateral, we all came together perfectly to tell the same story: there’s the familiar Britain you see on the surface, which you think you know; then there’s a whole other Britain underneath. Let’s all look at that one.

Fairway Galle Literary Festival announces authors for 2019

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival (GLF) 2019 will take place from 16 – 20 January 2019, marking the festival’s tenth anniversary.

For this year, 26 of the writers who will be travelling to Sri Lanka to take part in FGLF 2019, were shared with the public on Thursday 25 by Jill Macdonald, the Festival curator.

However, she said,

“The following list remains non-exclusive and in the months leading up to the Festival, there will be several surprise announcements.”

Anthony Horowitz, one of the most prolific and successful writers in the UK, is on the list. His Alex Rider books have sold over 16 million copies and he is the only modern writer to have been invited by Ian Fleming’s trustees to write two James Bond novels.

Also scheduled to attend is Sir David Hare, one of the most celebrated and best known of contemporary playwrights, who was also the screen writer of the highly acclaimed film ‘The Hours’ which was nominated for 9 Academy awards.

Another scheduled participant is none other than Lucy Fleming, niece of Ian Fleming, of James Bond fame.

The Festival, which has established itself as a much anticipated and highly acclaimed fixture on the South-East Asian cultural calendar, attracts thousands of people each year.

It has evolved into a cultural attraction which greatly encourages tourism and brings highly educated and influential visitors to the UNESCO world heritage of Galle each year.

GLF has reminded the world of Sri Lanka’s deep commitment to literature and the arts as pursuits underlining the distinctive human capacity for creativity, and it has only continued to grow since its inception over a decade ago.

The list includes:

  1. Sir David Hare – one of the most celebrated and best known contemporary playwrights, who was also the screen writer of the highly acclaimed film ‘The Hours” which was nominated for 9 Academy awards.
  2. Sir Don McCullin – One of the most admired photojournalists of his time, he’s had a powerful impact on public knowledge of news to which access is difficult or complicated.
  3. Fatima Bhutto – The niece of former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto, she is a poet who is also a journalist and writer of fiction. Her book ‘The Shadow of the Crescent Moon” was long-listed in 2014 for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction.
  4. William Dalrymple – The award winning writer of numerous books related to history and travel. Based in India, he is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature and is also one of the co-founders of the Jaipur Literature Festival.
  5. Madeleine Thien – A distinguished Canadian writer, joining GLF after a hectic year of touring, her most recent book, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, The novel was named a New York Times Critics’ Top Book of 2016.
  6. Romesh Gunasekera – A highly acclaimed writer, who was part of the initial conception of GLF with its founder Jeffrey Dobbs. His stunning early works Reef was shortlisted for The Booker Prize.
  7. Vahni Capildeo – Without a doubt, one of the most exciting and interesting voices in contemporary English poetry. Her interest in literature was sparked when she heard Romesh Gunasekera speak at an event and she is most excited to visit his home country.
  8. Tishani Doshi – A poet, writer and dancer based in India, she has been the lead dancer in the Chandralekha Troupe and has toured the world with her dance troupe, and hence, the human body plays an important role in her poetry.
  9. Carlo Pizzati – A Fiction and Non-fiction writer, he is also an award winning journalist. Pizzati is the first Italian writer to be featured at GLF.
  10. Thomas Bell – His book on Kathmandu attracted a lot of critical attention and is known by critics in modern writing as the seminal book on Kathmandu.
  11. Kavitha YagaBuggana – Her travel memoir, “Walking in Clouds” will be released November 2018 by Harper Collins and GLF will be her first public appearance after its publication.
  12. Kamila Shamsie – The author of seven novels, which have been translated into over 20 languages, she is also a highly respected literary critic.
  13. Lucy Fleming – she is the niece of Ian Fleming, of James Bond fame. Lucy is an experienced performer and will be performing the west end production “Posting Letters to the Moon” with her husband Simon Williams.
  14. Simon Williams – Featured in Sir David Hare’s plays, Simon will conduct a Drama workshop which will be the first one ever to be done at GLF, for adults.
  15. Tassie Seneviratne – A retired Senior Superintendent of the Police, his book Human Right and Policing – Reminiscences of my Police Days, recounts his days as a police officer and the stories of the various police officers he worked with during the Sri Lankan civil war.
  16. Anthony Horowitz – One of the most prolific and successful writers in the UK. His Alex Rider books have sold over 16 million copies and he is the only modern writer to have been invited by Ian Fleming’s trustees to write two James Bond novels.
  17. Justine Picardie – A fashion writer, a novelist and a biographer. She is currently the Editor-In-Chief of Harper’s Bazaar UK. Her talk on Coco Chanel’s biography at the FGLF 2018 was wildly popular.
  18. Rachel Johnson – The first female graduate trainee at the Financial Times, she is also the sister of Boris Johnson, Member of Parliament of the United Kingdom.
  19. Nandana Sen – An award-winning children’s author, she published her first story as a child, and went on to become a top literature student at Harvard University. She has also acted in more than 20 feature films.
  20. Dinah Jefferies – Author of several bestselling novels, one of which is The Tea Planter’s Wife – a Sunday Times number one bestseller- set in Sri Lanka when it was known as Ceylon. She was set to be a part of GLF last year, but unfortunately fell ill; she is keen to join the Festival in 2019.
  21. Charles Cumming – A rising star in the genre of detective writing, shortly after university he was approached for recruitment by the Secret Intelligence Service (MI6), an experience that inspired his first novel, A Spy by Nature.
  22. Senthuran Varatharajah – An award-winning German novelist of Sri Lankan origin, he was connected with GLF via the Goethe-Institute Sri Lanka who are the principal cultural sponsors for GLF.
  23. Ramya Chamalie Jirasinghe – She has written poetry, a few books of non-fiction and her first collection of poems, There’s an Island in the Bone won the 2011 Sri Lanka State Literary Joint Award.
  24. Anne Enright – She won the Booker prize for her novel The Gathering, and she is a highly sought after author for literary festivals due to her engaging and joyful nature.
  25. Herve le Tellier – A writer, journalist and food critic, he began his career as a scientific journalist and has published numerous books in French and English.
  26. Peter Kuruvita – Born to Sri Lankan and Austrian parents, he shares his love for Sri Lankan food through his work as a chef and his book Serendip My Sri Lankan Kitchen.

By Dimithri Wijesinghe – http://www.themorning.lk/fairway-galle-literary-festival-announces-authors-for-2019/

Fairway Galle Literary Festival – www.ft.lk

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival will take place from 16 to 20 January 2019. This marks the 10th anniversary of The Festival, which has established itself as a much anticipated and highly acclaimed fixture on the South-East Asian cultural calendar. It is a Festival admired the world over and draws first-class writers, academics, artists, film directors, musicians and dancers who treasure its district atmosphere and ambience.

The distinguished writer Alexander McCall Smith describes the Fairway Galle Literary Festival in this way: “The Fairway Galle Literary Festival is without doubt one of the most charming literary festivals in the world. The setting is superb, the people friendly and the program stimulating – a perfect festival in every respect.”

The Festival attracts thousands of people each year, many of whom travel to Sri Lanka especially to attend this cultural attraction that greatly encourages tourism and brings highly educated and influential visitors to the UNESCO world heritage of Galle each year. Indeed Sri Lanka’s stature as a tourist destination has enjoyed an enormous boost as a result of the Festival, which astonishingly, managed to achieve this even at the darkest time for tourism, before the end of the civil war. During that very difficult period, the Festival reminded the world of Sri Lanka’s deep commitment to literature and the arts as pursuits underlining the distinctive human capacity for creativity.

Writers travelling to Sri Lanka to take part in this year’s Festival include Sir David Hare, one of the most celebrated and best known of contemporary playwrights, with over 30 plays and 25 screenplays for film and television to his name. More importantly, in a millennial poll of the 100 best plays of the 20th century, five were his. Kamila Shamise’s reputation as one of the most respected voices in literature today is reflected in her selection as one of the judges of the Best Ever Man Booker Prize winner. Her choice of Michael Ondaatje’s ‘The English Patient’ as the winner for the decade of the 1990s proved prescient; the novel won the final award. Shamsie’s own most recent novel, ‘Home Fire’, was long listed for the 2017 Man Booker Prize and won the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018.  A powerful reworking for modern times of the story of Antigone, ‘Home Fire’ explores the clash between society, family and faith.

Sir Don McCullin joins us in Galle in advance of a major retrospective exhibition of his work at the Tate Gallery in London. As one of the most admired photojournalists of his time, Sir Don has had a powerful impact on public knowledge of news to which access is difficult or complicated. A recipient of the Best Press Photo Award, Sir Don is also a landscape photographer whose arresting images are captured in his most recent publication, ‘Landscapes’.

Poets have played a major role in each year’s Festival, helping us to interpret the human experiences as it is played out across the globe. This year we welcome Fatima Bhutto, who is also a journalist and writer of fiction. Her four books include ‘Songs of Blood and Sword’ and the highly acclaimed ‘The Shadow of the Crescent Moon’, which was longlisted in 2014 for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction. Fatima is the niece of former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto. Vahni Capildeo is a poet whose collection ‘Measures of Expatriation’ won the very distinguished Forward Prize for Poetry in 2016 (past winners of the prize include Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Peter Porter and Carol Ann Duffy) and was also shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize. Born in Trinidad, she was a Rhodes Scholar and is one of the most exciting and interesting voices in contemporary English poetry.

The distinguished Canadian writer Madeleine Thien’s most recent book, ‘Do Not Say We Have Nothing’, was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, the Women’s Prize for Fiction and The Folio Prize and won the 2016 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction The novel was named a New York Times Critics’ Top Book of 2016 and long-listed for a Carnegie Medal. Madeleine’s books have been translated into twenty-five languages and her essays and stories have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Brick, Frieze, Granta, and elsewhere. She lives in Montreal and New York, and is a Professor of English at Brooklyn College.

Anthony Horowitz is one of the most prolific and successful writers in the UK. His Alex Rider books have sold over 16 million copies and he is the only modern writer to have been invited by Ian Fleming’s trustees to write two James Bond novels: ‘Trigger Mortis’ and ‘Forever and a Day’, the latter being a prequel to ‘Casino Royale’, the first of Ian Fleming’s 007 novels. A rising star in the genre of detective writing, Charles Cumming has been described as ‘the true heir of Fleming and Le Carre’ and his powerful novels of espionage owe much to his own experience as an agent with M16.

Romesh Gunasekera is a highly acclaimed writer whose stunning early work ‘Reef’ was shortlisted for The Booker Prize. His most recent publication, ‘Noontide Toll’, captures a vital moment in the aftermath of the civil war in Sri Lanka and was featured in The New Yorker. The esteem in which he is held internationally is amply reflected in his selection as Chair of the Judges for the 2015 Commonwealth Short Story Prize and he was also a Judge for Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists Prize He has been a Guest Director at the Cheltenham Festival and was for four years on the Council of the Royal Society of Literature.

A truly international citizen, William Dalrymple is the award winning writer of numerous books related to history and travel. Four times longlisted and once shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, he is a recipient of the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize and the Thomas Cook Travel Award. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, Dalrymple is also one of the cofounders of the Jaipur Literature Festival.

The Festival also highlights outstanding Sri Lankan literature and is a way of sharing this with the worldwide community of readers. This year they present Ramya Jirasinghe, whose first collection of poems, ‘There’s an Island in the Bone’ won the 2011 Sri Lanka State Literary Prize, was longlisted for Ireland’s Fish Poetry Prize, and joint runner-up for the Guardian Orange First Words Prize in 2009. The TimesOnline, UK, featured her in its 2009 selection of contemporary war poetry. Her most recent book of poems, ‘Love Poems from a Frangipani Garden’, is published by Mica Press, UK.

Founded with the aim both of attracting top writers to Sri Lanka and of showcasing Sri Lanka’s own rich treasure of arts and letters, The Festival has in its 10 years of operation considerably expanded the scope and  range of its activities. It now includes two Children’s Programs – one for which tickets may be purchased and one that is not ticketed and therefore widely available to schoolchildren and young people in the Galle area. The Festival’s North-South Program brings together invited university students from all over the country, to participate in a bespoke Festival Program while also attending events in the main programme. A special Sinhala Day Program allows for a concentration on Sri Lankan literature, while the Teacher Training Program ensures The Festival makes a direct and meaningful contribution to the lives of young people in the southern province. Teachers and students may apply for reduced rates of entry to ticketed events

Internationally acclaimed Child Rights Activist and author of children’s books Nandana Sen will be with us in Galle and will contribute to the Children’s Program. Nandana is transparently committed to children’s safety and sees creative writing for children as an emotionally safe way of making children and young people more aware of the world they live in.

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival is also a Festival of the Arts and the Art Trail showcases the work of international and local artists and will this year include workshops enabling those attending the Festival to benefit from the experience and expertise of the artists involved. Musical performances will take place in locations in and around the Fort and have been arranged to complement the literary and artistic content of the Program. Curated walks highlighting significant architectural and historical features of the Fort and the Galle area provide stimulating context for the event. Festival lunches and dinners, often taking place in private homes, afford those attending the Festival the opportunity to interact closely with writers and participating artists and are much sought after attractions of the Festival. Among celebrity chefs joining us at the Festival this year is Peter Kuruwita, who will launch his new cookery book at this time.

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival takes place owing to the very generous sponsorship of the title sponsor Fairway Holdings.

The Festival also enjoys the support of Hospitality Partner Jetwing Hotels, while Sri Lanka Telecom is the Telecommunication Partner. The Banking Partner is DFCC Bank and MTV/MBC is the Broadcast Partner. The Festival is grateful to Wijeya Newspapers the Print Media Partner.

Jetwing Travels is the Bronze Partners the Festival.

Cultural sponsors play an important role in supporting the Festival and these include: The Goethe Institute, The Alliance Francaise de Kotte, The High Commission for South Africa, The Embassy for the Netherlands and The Embassy for Italy.

Friends of the Festival include Barefoot Bookshop, Vijitha Yapa Bookshop, the Perera-Hussain Publishing House and Water mart.

Read original article at the following link – http://www.ft.lk/entertainment-sectors/Fairway-Galle-Literary-Festival-to-take-place-from-16—20-January-2019/10405-665971

Galle Literary Festival 2019 – www.colombogazette.com

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival will take place from 16 to 20 January 2019. This marks the tenth anniversary of The Festival, which has established itself as a much anticipated and highly acclaimed fixture on the South-East Asian cultural calendar. It is a Festival admired the world over and draws first-class writers, academics, artists, film directors, musicians and dancers who treasure its district atmosphere and ambience. The distinguished writer Alexander McCall Smith describes the Fairway Galle Literary Festival in this way: “The Fairway Galle Literary Festival is without doubt one of the most charming literary festivals in the world. The setting is superb, the people friendly and the programme stimulating – a perfect festival in every respect.” .

The Festival attracts thousands of people each year, many of whom travel to Sri Lanka especially to attend this cultural attraction that greatly encourages tourism and brings highly educated and influential visitors to the UNESCO world heritage of Galle each year. Indeed Sri Lanka’s stature as a tourist destination has enjoyed an enormous boost as a result of the Festival, which astonishingly, managed to achieve this even at the darkest time for tourism, before the end of the civil war. During that very difficult period, the Festival reminded the world of Sri Lanka’s deep commitment to literature and the arts as pursuits underlining the distinctive human capacity for creativity.

Writers travelling to Sri Lanka to take part in this year’s Festival include Sir David Hare, one of the most celebrated and best known of contemporary playwrights, with over thirty plays and twenty-five screenplays for film and television to his name. More importantly, in a millennial poll of the hundred best plays of the twentieth century, five were his.

Kamila Shamise’s reputation as one of the most respected voices in literature today is reflected in her selection as one of the judges of the Best Ever Man Booker Prize winner. Her choice of Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient as the winner for the decade of the 1990’s proved prescient; the novel won the final award. Shamsie’s own most recent novel, Home Fire, was long listed for the 2017 Man Booker Prize and won the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018. A powerful reworking for modern times of the story of Antigone, Home Fire explores the clash between society, family and faith.

Sir Don McCullin joins us in Galle in advance of a major retrospective exhibition of his work at the Tate Gallery in London. As one of the most admired photojournalists of his time, Sir Don has had a powerful impact on public knowledge of news to which access is difficult or complicated. A recipient of the Best Press Photo Award, Sir Don is also a landscape photographer whose arresting images are captured in his most recent publication, Landscapes.

Poets have played a major role in each year’s Festival, helping us to interpret the human experiences as it is played out across the globe. This year we welcome Fatima Bhutto, who is also a journalist and writer of fiction. Her four books include Songs of Blood and Sword and the highly acclaimed The Shadow of the Crescent Moon, which was longlisted in 2014 for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction, Fatima is the niece of former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto. Vahni Capildeo is a poet whose collection Measures of Expatriation won the very distinguished Forward Prize for Poetry in 2016 (past winners of the prize include Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Peter Porter and Carol Ann Duffy) and was also shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize. Born in Trinidad, she was a Rhodes Scholar and is one of the most exciting and interesting voices in contemporary English poetry.

The distinguished Canadian writer Madeleine Thien’s most recent book, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, the Women’s Prize for Fiction and The Folio Prize and won the 2016 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction The novel was named a New York Times Critics’ Top Book of 2016 and long-listed for a Carnegie Medal. Madeleine’s books have been translated into twenty-five languages and her essays and stories have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Brick, Frieze, Granta, and elsewhere. She lives in Montreal and New York, and is a Professor of English at Brooklyn College.

Anthony Horowitz is one of the most prolific and successful writers in the UK. His Alex Rider books have sold over 16 million copies and he is the only modern writer to have been invited by Ian Fleming’s trustees to write two James Bond novels: Trigger Mortis and Forever and a Day, the latter being a prequel to Casino Royale, the first of Ian Fleming’s 007 novels. A rising star in the genre of detective writing, Charles Cumming has been described as “the true heir of Fleming and Le Carre” and his powerful novels of espionage owe much to his own experience as an agent with M16.

Romesh Gunasekera is a highly acclaimed writer whose stunning early work Reef was shortlisted for The Booker Prize. His most recent publication, Noontide Toll, captures a vital moment in the aftermath of the civil war in Sri Lanka and was featured in The New Yorker. The esteem in which he is held internationally is amply reflected in his selection as Chair of the Judges for the 2015 Commonwealth Short Story Prize and he was also a Judge for Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists Prize He has been a Guest Director at the Cheltenham Festival and was for four years on the Council of the Royal Society of Literature.

A truly international citizen, William Dalrymple is the award winning writer of numerous books related to history and travel. Four times longlisted and once shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, he is a recipient of the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize and the Thomas Cook Travel Award. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, Dalrymple is also one of the cofounders of the Jaipur Literature Festival.

The Festival also highlights outstanding Sri Lankan literature and is a way of sharing this with the worldwide community of readers. We are honoured this year to preset Ramya Jirasinghe, whose first collection of poems, There’s an Island in the Bone won the 2011 Sri Lanka State Literary Prize, was longlisted for Ireland’s Fish Poetry Prize, and joint runner-up for the Guardian Orange First Words Prize in 2009. The TimesOnline, UK, featured her in its 2009 selection of contemporary war poetry. Her most recent book of poems, Love Poems from a Frangipani Garden, is published by Mica Press, UK.

Founded with the aim both of attracting top writers to Sri Lanka and of showcasing Sri Lanka’s own rich treasure of arts and letters, The Festival has in its ten years of operation considerably expanded the scope and range of its activities. It now includes two Children’s Programmes – one for which tickets may be purchased and one that is not ticketed and therefore widely available to schoolchildren and young people in the Galle area. The Festival’s North-South Programme brings together invited university students from all over the country, to participate in a bespoke Festival Programme while also attending events in the main programme. A special Sinhala Day Programme allows for a concentration on Sri Lankan literature, while the Teacher Training Programme ensures The Festival makes a direct and meaningful contribution to the lives of young people in the southern province. Teachers and students may apply for reduced rates of entry to ticketed events

Internationally acclaimed Child Rights Activist and author of children’s books Nandana Sen will be with us in Galle and will contribute to the Children’s Programme. Nandana is transparently committed to children’s safety and sees creative writing for children as an emotionally safe way of making children and young people more aware of the world they live in.

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival is also a Festival of the Arts and the Art Trail showcases the work of international and local artists and will this year include workshops enabling those attending the Festival to benefit from the experience and expertise of the artists involved. Musical performances will take place in locations in and around the Fort and have been arranged to complement the literary and artistic content of the Programme. Curated walks highlighting significant architectural and historical features of the Fort and the Galle area provide timulating context for the event . Festival lunches and dinners, often taking place in private homes, afford those attending the Festival the opportunity to interact closely with writers and participating artists and are much sought after attractions of the Festival. Among celebrity chefs joining us at the Festival this year is Peter Kuruwita, who will launch his new cookery book at this time.

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival takes place owing to the very generous sponsorship of the title sponsor Fairway Holdings.

The Festival also enjoys the support of Hospitality Partner Jetwing Hotels, while Sri Lanka Telecom is the Telecommunication Partner. The Banking Partner is DFCC Bank and MTV/MBC is the Broadcast Partner. Jetwing Travels is the Bronze Partners the Festival.

Cultural sponsors play an important role in supporting the Festival and these include: The Goethe Institute, The Alliance Francaise de Kotte, The High Commission for South Africa, The Embassy for the Netherlands and The Embassy for Italy.

Friends of the Festival include Barefoot Bookshop, Vijitha Yapa Bookshop, the Perera-Hussain Publishing House and Water mart.

Read Original article – http://colombogazette.com/2018/10/26/top-international-and-local-authors-confirmed-for-galle-literary-festival-2019/

Galle Literary Festival 2019 – Leisure.lk

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival will take place from 16 to 20 January 2019. This marks the tenth anniversary of The Festival, which has established itself as a much anticipated and highly acclaimed fixture on the South-East Asian cultural calendar. It is a Festival admired the world over and draws first-class writers, academics, artists, film directors, musicians and dancers who treasure its district atmosphere and ambience. The distinguished writer Alexander McCall Smith describes the Fairway Galle Literary Festival in this way: “The Fairway Galle Literary Festival is without doubt one of the most charming literary festivals in the world. The setting is superb, the people friendly and the programme stimulating – a perfect festival in every respect.” .

The Festival attracts thousands of people each year, many of whom travel to Sri Lanka especially to attend this cultural attraction that greatly encourages tourism and brings highly educated and influential visitors to the UNESCO world heritage of Galle each year. Indeed Sri Lanka’s stature as a tourist destination has enjoyed an enormous boost as a result of the Festival, which astonishingly, managed to achieve this even at the darkest time for tourism, before the end of the civil war. During that very difficult period, the Festival reminded the world of Sri Lanka’s deep commitment to literature and the arts as pursuits underlining the distinctive human capacity for creativity.

Writers travelling to Sri Lanka to take part in this year’s Festival include Sir David Hare, one of the most celebrated and best known of contemporary playwrights, with over thirty plays and twenty-five screenplays for film and television to his name. More importantly, in a millennial poll of the hundred best plays of the twentieth century, five were his.

Kamila Shamise’s reputation as one of the most respected voices in literature today is reflected in her selection as one of the judges of the Best Ever Man Booker Prize winner. Her choice of Michael Ondaatje’s The English Patient as the winner for the decade of the 1990’s proved prescient; the novel won the final award. Shamsie’s own most recent novel, Home Fire, was long listed for the 2017 Man Booker Prize and won the Women’s Prize for Fiction 2018. A powerful reworking for modern times of the story of Antigone, Home Fire explores the clash between society, family and faith.

Sir Don McCullin joins us in Galle in advance of a major retrospective exhibition of his work at the Tate Gallery in London. As one of the most admired photojournalists of his time, Sir Don has had a powerful impact on public knowledge of news to which access is difficult or complicated. A recipient of the Best Press Photo Award, Sir Don is also a landscape photographer whose arresting images are captured in his most recent publication, Landscapes.

Poets have played a major role in each year’s Festival, helping us to interpret the human experiences as it is played out across the globe. This year we welcome Fatima Bhutto, who is also a journalist and writer of fiction. Her four books include Songs of Blood and Sword and the highly acclaimed The Shadow of the Crescent Moon, which was longlisted in 2014 for the Bailey’s Women’s Prize for Fiction, Fatima is the niece of former Prime Minister of Pakistan Benazir Bhutto. Vahni Capildeo is a poet whose collection Measures of Expatriation won the very distinguished Forward Prize for Poetry in 2016 (past winners of the prize include Ted Hughes, Seamus Heaney, Peter Porter and Carol Ann Duffy) and was also shortlisted for the T.S. Eliot Prize. Born in Trinidad, she was a Rhodes Scholar and is one of the most exciting and interesting voices in contemporary English poetry.

The distinguished Canadian writer Madeleine Thien’s most recent book, Do Not Say We Have Nothing, was shortlisted for the 2016 Man Booker Prize, the Women’s Prize for Fiction and The Folio Prize and won the 2016 Scotiabank Giller Prize and the Governor-General’s Literary Award for Fiction The novel was named a New York Times Critics’ Top Book of 2016 and long-listed for a Carnegie Medal. Madeleine’s books have been translated into twenty-five languages and her essays and stories have appeared in The New York Times, The Guardian, Brick, Frieze, Granta, and elsewhere. She lives in Montreal and New York, and is a Professor of English at Brooklyn College.

Anthony Horowitz is one of the most prolific and successful writers in the UK. His Alex Rider books have sold over 16 million copies and he is the only modern writer to have been invited by Ian Fleming’s trustees to write two James Bond novels: Trigger Mortis and Forever and a Day, the latter being a prequel to Casino Royale, the first of Ian Fleming’s 007 novels. A rising star in the genre of detective writing, Charles Cumming has been described as “the true heir of Fleming and Le Carre” and his powerful novels of espionage owe much to his own experience as an agent with M16.

Romesh Gunasekera is a highly acclaimed writer whose stunning early work Reef was shortlisted for The Booker Prize. His most recent publication, Noontide Toll, captures a vital moment in the aftermath of the civil war in Sri Lanka and was featured in The New Yorker. The esteem in which he is held internationally is amply reflected in his selection as Chair of the Judges for the 2015 Commonwealth Short Story Prize and he was also a Judge for Granta’s Best of Young British Novelists Prize He has been a Guest Director at the Cheltenham Festival and was for four years on the Council of the Royal Society of Literature.

A truly international citizen, William Dalrymple is the award winning writer of numerous books related to history and travel. Four times longlisted and once shortlisted for the Samuel Johnson Prize for non-fiction, he is a recipient of the Duff Cooper Memorial Prize and the Thomas Cook Travel Award. A Fellow of the Royal Society of Literature, Dalrymple is also one of the cofounders of the Jaipur Literature Festival.

The Festival also highlights outstanding Sri Lankan literature and is a way of sharing this with the worldwide community of readers. We are honoured this year to preset Ramya Jirasinghe, whose first collection of poems, There’s an Island in the Bone won the 2011 Sri Lanka State Literary Prize, was longlisted for Ireland’s Fish Poetry Prize, and joint runner-up for the Guardian Orange First Words Prize in 2009. The TimesOnline, UK, featured her in its 2009 selection of contemporary war poetry. Her most recent book of poems, Love Poems from a Frangipani Garden, is published by Mica Press, UK.

Founded with the aim both of attracting top writers to Sri Lanka and of showcasing Sri Lanka’s own rich treasure of arts and letters, The Festival has in its ten years of operation considerably expanded the scope and range of its activities. It now includes two Children’s Programmes – one for which tickets may be purchased and one that is not ticketed and therefore widely available to schoolchildren and young people in the Galle area. The Festival’s North-South Programme brings together invited university students from all over the country, to participate in a bespoke Festival Programme while also attending events in the main programme. A special Sinhala Day Programme allows for a concentration on Sri Lankan literature, while the Teacher Training Programme ensures The Festival makes a direct and meaningful contribution to the lives of young people in the southern province. Teachers and students may apply for reduced rates of entry to ticketed events

Internationally acclaimed Child Rights Activist and author of children’s books Nandana Sen will be with us in Galle and will contribute to the Children’s Programme. Nandana is transparently committed to children’s safety and sees creative writing for children as an emotionally safe way of making children and young people more aware of the world they live in.

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival is also a Festival of the Arts and the Art Trail showcases the work of international and local artists and will this year include workshops enabling those attending the Festival to benefit from the experience and expertise of the artists involved. Musical performances will take place in locations in and around the Fort and have been arranged to complement the literary and artistic content of the Programme. Curated walks highlighting significant architectural and historical features of the Fort and the Galle area provide timulating context for the event . Festival lunches and dinners, often taking place in private homes, afford those attending the Festival the opportunity to interact closely with writers and participating artists and are much sought after attractions of the Festival. Among celebrity chefs joining us at the Festival this year is Peter Kuruwita, who will launch his new cookery book at this time.

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival takes place owing to the very generous sponsorship of the title sponsor Fairway Holdings.

The Festival also enjoys the support of Hospitality Partner Jetwing Hotels, while Sri Lanka Telecom is the Telecommunication Partner. The Banking Partner is DFCC Bank and MTV/MBC is the Broadcast Partner. Jetwing Travels is the Bronze Partners the Festival.

Cultural sponsors play an important role in supporting the Festival and these include: The Goethe Institute, The Alliance Francaise de Kotte, The High Commission for South Africa, The Embassy for the Netherlands and The Embassy for Italy.

Friends of the Festival include Barefoot Bookshop, Vijitha Yapa Bookshop, the Perera-Hussain Publishing House and Water mart.

Original Article at this link – http://leisureplus.lk/top-international-and-local-authors-confirmed-for-galle-literary-festival-2019/

Gin Tasting Event Rescheduled

Dear Festival Goers,

We would like to inform you that there has been a rescheduling of the following event that was set to take place from 6pm – 7pm will now taking place from 5pm – 6pm at The Fort Printers on the corner of Pedlar and Church Street.

Updated Event Details:

Saturday, Jan 27th, 2018
5:00 pm – 6:00 pm

FGLF 2018 Event - Graham Merricks: The Colombo Gin Club.

Graham Merricks: The Colombo Gin Club

  • Event: Gin Tasting
  • Participant: Graham Merricks
  • Location: The Fort Printers, Galle Fort
  • Date: Saturday, Jan 27th, 2018
  • Time: 5pm – 6pm
  • Duration: 1:00 hrs
  • Access: Event Ticket Only
  • Availability: SOLD OUT

The Colombo Gin Club makes its way to the Fairway Galle Literary Festival 2018! Join veteran gin enthusiast Graham Merricks from Wine World as he explores 4 absolutely lip smacking gins.

(Graham Merricks’ participation at the festival is courtesy of Wine World.)

EVENT TICKET: Rs. 3,500 – Sold Out

Ticket Availability Update for Sunday, Jan 28th

Tickets for the following FLGF events on Sunday, January 28th, 2018 are still available.

Tickets can be purchased online (please click the BUY button) or at the Box Office at : Sports Hall, next to the Hall de Galle, Galle Fort

View Updated Program Summary: Download PDF

FGLF

Sunday, Jan 28th 2018
8:15 am – 9:30 am

FGLF 2018 Event - The Reverend Dr. Malcolm Guite - Morning Worship.

The Reverend Dr. Malcolm Guite: Morning Worship

  • Event: Morning Worship
  • Participant: Reverend Dr. Malcolm Guite
  • Location: All Saints Church, Galle Fort
  • Duration: 1:15 hrs
  • Access: FREE EVENT
  • Availability: N/A

The Reverend Doctor Malcolm Guite will preach at this morning service

FGLF

Sunday, Jan 28th 2018
10:45 am – 11:45 am

FGLF 2018 Event - Richard Flanagan - The Narrow Road to The Deep North and First Person.

Richard Flanagan: The Narrow Road to The Deep North and First Person

  • Event: In Conversation with Chris Hanley
  • Participant: Richard Flanagan
  • Location: Jetwing Lighthouse, Galle.
  • Duration: 1:00 hrs.
  • Access: Event Ticket / Festival Pass
  • Availability: 250 seats.

Mark Twain, describing the journey that would take him to Australia, famously said that truth is stranger than fiction.  Richard Flanagan goes one step further and says  “Fiction is not a lie but a truth, a necessary truth  . . . Without fiction, we poison ourselves on the lies of the first person . . . For if story as lies leads us to a dark place, story as fiction offers the possibility of transcendence and liberation, the recognition of the many things each of us are.”

Richard Flanagan began his most recent novel First Person before he won the 2014 Man Booker Prize for The Narrow Road to The Deep North. In conversation with fellow Australian Chris Hanley, Founder of the Byron Bay Literary Festival, Richard will share with us the extraordinary story of how he came to write First Person and arising from that, his views on the writing experience and in particular, on the relationship between self and creation.

(Richard Flanagan’s presence at the Festival is made possible by the generous sponsorship of the Festival title sponsor Fairway Holdings Ltd.)

Event Ticket: Rs. 1,000

Buy Tickets

Or with Festival Pass

FGLF

 Sunday, Jan 28th 2018
12:00 noon – 1:00 pm

FGLF 2018 Event - Pankaj Mishra & Nisid Hajari - Whither Asia?

Pankaj Mishra & Nisid Hajari: Whither Asia?

  • Event: In Conversation.
  • Participant: Pankaj Mishra & Nisid Hajari
  • Location: Jetwing Lighthouse, Galle.
  • Date: Sunday, Jan 28th 2018
  • Duration: 1:00 hrs.
  • Access: Event Ticket / Festival Pass
  • Availability: 250 seats.

In this, the Final Festival session for 2018, Pankaj Mishra, one of the foremost intellectuals of the day and acclaimed writer of the 2017 publication Age of Anger: A History of the Present, will discuss the future of Asia through the lens of the past with Nisid Hajari, foreign affairs analyst and author of Midnight’s Furies: The Deadly Legacy of India’s Partition.

(Pankaj Mishra’s participation in the Festival is made possible by the generous sponsorship of DFCC Bank.)

Event Ticket: Rs. 1,000

Buy Tickets

Or with Festival Pass

FGLF

Sunday, Jan 28th 2018
12:00 noon – 6:00 pm

FGLF 2018 Event - Jazz Festival, Fashion Show and Gourmet Galle.

Jazz Festival, Fashion Show and Gourmet Galle

  • Event: Street food, Cocktails, Jazz and Fashion Show
  • Participant: Jerome & Tanuja with other Local and International Artists
  • Location: Law Court Square, Galle Fort
  • Duration: 6:00 hrs
  • Access: FREE EVENT
  • Availability: N/A

The Fairway Galle Literary Festival 2018 will wrap up on Sunday afternoon with a celebration of jazz in the Law Court Square. We will have favourite locals, including Jerome and Tanuja, as well as international artists performing. The afternoon will also feature a fashion show, great street food, wine, beer and cocktails.

FGLF

Sunday, Jan 28th 2018
7:30 pm – 9:00 pm

FGLF 2018 Event - Chariots of Fire (1981) - A Screening.

Chariots of Fire (1981): A Screening

  • Event: Film Screening
  • Location: Law Court Square, Galle Fort
  • Duration: 1:30 hrs
  • Access: FREE EVENT
  • Availability: N/A

This film was the brain-child of The Lord David Puttnam and depicts the compelling story of two young men determined to be true to themselves in the class-obsessed and religiously divided United Kingdom of the early 1920s. Each of these two young men is preparing to take part in the 1924 Paris Olympics, the first Olympics to take place after the long interval during which the First World War precluded the event. Eric Liddell (Ian Charleson), a devout Christian born to Scottish missionaries in China, sees running as part of his worship of God’s glory and refuses to train or compete on the Sabbath, even when the Olympic timetable calls for him to do so.  Harold Abrahams (Ben Cross) overcomes anti-Semitism and class bias, but neglects his beloved sweetheart Sybil (Alice Krige) and antagonises the Fellows of his Cambridge College in his single-minded quest. Ultimately the two men’s single-mindedness paradoxically works in tandem, enabling each to emerge from the Olympics having met the demands both of country and conscience.

The Vengalis sound track for this film – with its inspiring classical feel and yet anachronistic electronic elements, perfectly captures the transitional moment in history at which this film takes place, and is still widely recognised.


View Programme: Main | Day 1 | Day 2 | Day 3 | Day 4 | Day 5 | Sinhala Day

Print Programme Summary: Download PDF